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Family Life

​Yearly, more than 20,000 foster care youth will “age out” of foster care.

Poor Outcomes

Outcomes for youth who have “aged out” of foster care are poor:

  • Between 25% and 45% had not completed high school
  • 20% to 50% are unemployed
  • Approximately 25% had experienced homelessness

How to Prep Foster Children for Adulthood

Foster parents and professionals who work with foster care youth can support “preparation for adulthood.” By gaining their trust, we can help youth to:
  • Stay engaged in school
  • Gain marketable work skills
  • Plan for safe, stable, and affordable housing
  • Teach basic life skills, such as completing a job application
  • Encourage keeping positive connections to supportive peers and adults
  • Plan for adequate access to health care
  • Learn how to access essential legal documents pertaining to their personal, family, medical, and educational histories

Youth with supportive coaching and strong connections can forge successful transitions out of foster care with our continued support.

Attention Foster Parents: Please Download & Share This Special AAP Handout with Teens Aging Out of Foster Care (PDF)

 

Additional Information

 

Author
Edited by Kenneth R. Ginsburg, MD, MS Ed, FAAP, FSAHM and Sara B. Kinsman, MD, PhD
Last Updated
3/31/2014
Source
Reaching Teens: Strength-based Communication Strategies to Build Resilience and Support Healthy Adolescent Development (Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics)
The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.