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Health Issues

​Males get eating disorders as well, with increasing prevalence now than in years past. They are actually more likely than females to get binge-eating disorder, and, by the latest estimates, they account for about 15% of cases of anorexia nervosa.

What to Look For:

It is important to keep a heightened sense of suspicion for these illnesses when adolescent males present with weight loss, vomiting, or other related concerns. Otherwise, these illnesses can go undetected and unchecked longer in males because they are not recognized as quickly and referred for good care.

Cultural Stigma:

It is also very important to reassure males that eating disorders are not “female” illnesses and to reinforce that there is no shame in acknowledging that they struggle with eating issues.

Additional Information:

 

Author
Edited by Kenneth R. Ginsburg, MD, MS Ed, FAAP, FSAHM and Sara B. Kinsman, MD, PhD
Last Updated
11/1/2013
Source
Reaching Teens: Strength-based Communication Strategies to Build Resilience and Support Healthy Adolescent Development (Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics)
The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.