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Healthy Living

Art © Eric Carle

Start talking, singing, and reading with your child from the beginning. He will learn that reading is a fun activity you share together.

  • Point to words as you read them, showing your child that the print carries the story.
  • Ask your child to name things she sees in the pictures. Talk about how the pictures relate to the story.
  • Reading doesn’t have to be a huge project. Even a 3 minute story every night before bedtime will help your child learn.

   

Discuss Healthy Active Living using The Very Hungry Caterpillar:

  • Teach your child that apples, pears, plums, strawberries, and oranges are all fruits. Ask him if he can name other fruits.
  • Talk to her about how fruits are good for the body.
  • Talk about how when the caterpillar overeats, he gets a stomachache— so it is important to stop eating when you feel full.
  • Talk about how some foods are “sometimes” foods—like cake and ice cream—and how it is not a good idea to eat them all the time.
  • After reading the page where the caterpillar eats the green leaf and feels better, talk to your child about how you too eat green leaves (lettuce, spinach, cabbage, etc.) and how it is good for your body.
  • Teach your child that is important to eat healthy foods, so he can grow up healthy and active like a butterfly.

Download a printable guide that contains healthy eating tips and a reader’s guide to using The Very Hungry Caterpillar to encourage conversations about healthy eating. Print it out and share it with family and friends.

   

Looking for more information? Be sure to visit the nutrition area of HealthyChildren.org.

Also, visit Penguin Young Readers Group for activity sheets, videos, and more information about The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle and Alliance for a Healthier Generation to learn how you can make healthy changes at home, in your child’s school and in your community.

 

Last Updated
5/11/2013
The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.