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Safety & Prevention

How do the AAP-recommended vaccines compare to what is done in other countries?

In the United States, we are fortunate to have a number of vaccines that are not normally used in other countries. Many countries of the world do not have the resources to provide immunizations to their children.

Our vaccine schedule is a bit different than that of other countries. In some cases, this is because the timing of infections is earlier. For example, infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae type B occur very early in Native Americans and Alaska Natives. The types of vaccines recommended for an area are based on the infections common in that area. In Asia, children receive a vaccine against Japanese encephalitis virus. This is not needed in the United States, where this virus is very rare.

Travelers often need additional vaccines for diseases like Japanese encephalitis or typhoid fever. Before you take your child on an international vacation, check with your pediatrician to see if your child needs any additional vaccines.

 

Last Updated
8/7/2013
Source
Immunizations & Infectious Diseases: An Informed Parent's Guide (Copyright © 2006 American Academy of Pediatrics)
The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.