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Focus on Preventing Poison
March 2017 | Issue No. 143
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With the arrival of spring, parents and children are eager to get outside and start working in the yard. While lawns and gardens are great places for children to learn and play, they can also be a danger if chemical fertilizers and pesticides are used.
 
Also In This Issue:
Ask the Pediatrician:
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By: Kristie E. N. Clarke, MD, MSCR, FAAP
Quick Childproofing Reminders: 
• Install a safety latches—that lock when you close the door—on child accessible cabinets.

• Never let your children handle or play with single-use laundry packets, and remember to seal the container and store it in a locked cabinet after each use.

• Purchase and keep medicines in original containers with safety caps. Check the label each time you give a child medicine to ensure proper dosage.

• Check your floors regularly for small objects. Make sure battery covers are secure on remote controls, key fobs, musical books, and greeting cards.

Get more tips here.

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No worries! We recorded it and have posted it. Watch and listen at your convenience—and feel free to share it with anyone traveling with kids during spring break or this summer!
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A new study published in Pediatrics, found that 68% of the errors made involved overdosing. Use of a dosing cup was associated with more dosing errors than when an oral syringe was used.  
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The information contained on this newsletter and on HealthyChildren.org should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.
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