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Safety & Prevention

The simplest way to avoid bathroom injuries is to make this room inaccessible unless your child is accompanied by an adult. This may mean installing a latch on the door at adult height so the child can’t get into the bathroom when you aren’t around. Also, be sure any lock on the door can be unlocked from the outside, just in case your child locks himself in.

The following suggestions will prevent injuries when your child is using the bathroom.

  • Children can drown in only a few inches of water, so never leave a young child alone in the bath, even for a moment. If you can’t ignore the doorbell or the phone, wrap your child in a towel and take him along when you go to answer them. Bath seats and rings are meant to be bathing aids and will not prevent drowning if the infant is left unattended. Never leave water in the bathtub when it is not in use.
  • Install no-slip strips on the bottom of the bathtub. Put a cushioned cover over the water faucet so your child won’t be hurt if he bumps his head against it. Get in the habit of closing the lid of the toilet, and get a toilet lid lock. A curious toddler who tries to play in the water can lose his balance and fall in.
  • To prevent scalding, the hottest temperature at the faucet should be no more than 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48.9 degrees Celsius). In many cases you can adjust your hot water heater. When your child is old enough to turn the faucets, teach him to start the cold water before the hot.
  • Keep all medicines in containers with safety caps. Remember, however, that these caps are child-resistant, not childproof, so store all medicines and cosmetics high and out of reach in a locked cabinet. Don’t keep toothpaste, soaps, shampoos, and other frequently used items in the same cabinet. Instead, store them in a hard-to-reach cabinet equipped with a safety latch or locks.
  • If you use electrical appliances in the bathroom, particularly hair dryers and razors, be sure to unplug them and store them in a cabinet with a safety lock when they aren’t in use. It is better to use them in another room where there is no water. An electrician can install special bathroom wall sockets (ground-fault circuit interrupters) that can lessen the likelihood of electrical injury when an appliance falls into the sink or bathwater.

 

Last Updated
8/7/2013
Source
Caring for Your Baby and Young Child: Birth to Age 5 (Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Pediatrics)
The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.